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Our Picks for ALA 2016

June 9, 2016
Our Picks for ALA 2016
ALA Annual Conference Orlando

Pack your ALA conference schedule with these sensational program-related sessions.

The countdown to the ALA Annual Conference has begun. In two short weeks, librarians and book-lovers will gather in Orlando for sessions, literature swag and sunshine. This year, the sessions range from introverted librarian tips and "Family Feud"-esque games, to Margaret Atwood appearances and social justice documentaries.

There are also a range of programming-related sessions; check out a few favorites of the ALA Public Programs Office below. What’s on your conference schedule? Share your suggestions in the comments.

Saturday, June 25

8:30 – 10 a.m.

Tweens are enjoying their time in the spotlight as one of the most popular demographics for publishers and marketers. But are libraries following along in a push to market services for them? Jumpstart your next tween program by exploring their preferences in collection development, technology and projects.

8:30 – 10 a.m.

In response to the recent tensions regarding equality, more librarians are creating unique and inclusive programming. Join Baltimore librarians in discussing how libraries can support social justice and inter-cultural understanding through programs and outreach efforts.

8:30 – 10 a.m.  

Whether you have a large budget or a modest budget, an Avenger team of librarians or two super teen librarians, you can host a successful comic-con. Leave this session armed with confidence and ideas for your next comic programming adventure.

9:30 – 11 a.m.

Join Congressman John Lewis — renowned civil rights leader and co-author of the acclaimed graphic novel series “March” — and the “March” co-creators for a special appearance celebrating the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Often called “one of the most courageous persons the civil rights movement ever produced,” Lewis will discuss the legacy of the movement, the power of visual literature to educate and inspire today’s youth and the crucial role of libraries in our democracy. A limited number of free, limited-edition books — the "March Trilogy Sampler" and replica copies of the 1957 comic book "Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story" — will be distributed while supplies last. A book signing will follow the program.

10:30 – 11:30 a.m.

If you’re interested in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) programming, networking and grant opportunities, this is the place for you! Share your ideas in the round-table discussion and participate in hands-on STEM activities. Make sure you join the STEM in Public Libraries Facebook group to stay updated. 

1 – 2:30 p.m.

Join leaders from the STAR Library Education Network (STAR_Net) as they share ways in which public libraries and STEM organizations are working together to increase access to STEM learning opportunities in low‐income communities. Arm yourself with free resources to start collaborating and strategizing partnerships.

1 – 2:30 p.m.

How well do you know your community? Turning Outward, a powerful community engagement approach created by The Harwood Institute for Public Innovation, teaches libraries how to tackle community challenges through a step-by-step approach: bringing people together, asking questions, building partnerships and taking action to lead positive change. Join Rich Harwood, founder of The Harwood Institute, and three public libraries  members of ALA’s Libraries Transforming Communities (LTC) Public Innovators Cohort  that have used the approach for the past two years to transform their communities.

3 – 4 p.m.

Programming is an intrinsically essential library service. The Programming Librarian Interest Group will teach you how to advocate for programming at your institution and provide a space to share ideas and successful strategies while networking with other professionals.

3 – 4 p.m.

By 2020, the older adult population will have grown 74 percent. Will your library be ready? The concept of recreation and leisure activities for seniors is changing, and libraries must be prepared to provide dynamic programming. Learn how to leverage community partnerships and the ins and outs of in-house programming through the success stories of a metropolitan library system.

 

Sunday, June 26

8:30 – 10 a.m.

STEM education is transforming libraries across the country, and you don’t need a large staff and generous budget to be a part of it. The STAR Library Education Network (STAR_Net) will demonstrate how STEM programming engages communities when successfully executed in libraries. Receive step-by-step instructions, free marketing resources and hands-on activity ideas that you can use at your library immediately.

8:30 – 10 a.m.

Through personal librarian programs, academic librarians are helping students overcome any apprehension or confusion related to library services. Listen to four academic librarians explain how to deliver personal librarian programs through unique goals, styles and approaches.

1 – 2:30 p.m.

Do you shop at the Dollar Store to make your resources stretch? Do you repeat the same crafts for every program? Do you want to provide excellent programs for teens using the budget and resources you already have at your disposal? This program will demonstrate how one library used a small budget and lots of creativity to provide geek-tastic programs, such as monthly fandom events and a successful comic-con.

1 – 2:30 p.m.

Come hear program success stories from three gifted librarians. Karen Neurohr from Oklahoma State University Library, winner of the 2015 ALA Excellence in Library Programming Award, will talk about her library’s award-winning Science Café series about gas exploration and potential impacts of oil. School librarians Jane Martellino and Mary Ellen Minichiello will share their own program models for K-12 schools.

4:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Many authors urge writers to “bring characters to life,” but what happens when librarians make that dream come true? The staff of the Curriculum Materials Center at the University of Central Florida turned popular teen books into live-action games with the help of colleges, public libraries and schools. Experience “The Hunger Games,” “Divergent” and “Camp Half Blood” in unexpected and daring ways.

 

Monday, June 27

8:30 – 10 a.m.

Discover how two innovative programs highlighted Native American history and culture through technology and American Indian literature.

3 – 4 p.m.

Inspired by parent and teacher feedback that many boys were "reluctant readers," two innovative media specialists joined forces to create irresistible book club programming with a little help from their tech toolbox. In this workshop, you’ll master how to rejuvenate the reading experience with free web 2.0 tools, take advantage of global reading events to generate excitement and use creative marketing strategies to lure unlikely participants.

ALA Annual Conference Orlando

 

Date / Time
Thursday, June 9, 2016 - 09:00
Comments:
Programming Librarian Forum