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Making Trivia Masters: Using Trivia to Turn Students into Explorers

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A woman looks for a book in the stacks.

A few months ago on Programming Librarian, I talked about asking a trivia question as part of your passive programming. Now, I've taken it a step further to create a Trivia Master Challenge that encourages students to search the library’s catalog, explore our nonfiction section, and learn how to search successfully within a book.

Passive Doesn't Mean Boring: 5 Passive Program Ideas for School Libraries

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Girls making bookmarks

Passive programs can be a great way to regularly attract students into the library without having planned, specific events. Pick a corner of the library that can be designated for these drop-by activities, set out the supplies and some instructions, and let it go! Here are a few of my go-to passive programs.

Group of girls making bookmarks

'Breakout' of the Mold: Breakout Programs in Libraries

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Group of boys who almost broke the code

Like the increasingly popular "escape rooms" — in which players solve a series of puzzles to break out of a room — Breakouts use a compelling story, time limit, and series of puzzles to create an interactive game. But instead of breaking out of a locked room, students must work together to break into a tightly locked box before the timer runs out. Puzzles lead to the combinations for the different types of locks, and many games also include a digital element.

5 Alternatives to Book Talks

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Kids participating in book speed dating

A great book talk can make anyone want to read any book, but sometimes you need an alternative. If you haven’t read your new books yet, you only have a couple copies of a book to lend, or — like me — you’re just not very comfortable with giving book talks, here are a few programs you can do with your classes to build excitement about reading.

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