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Modifying Bullet Journaling for Everyday Organization

jmassa's picture
A bullet journal

Programming is the ultimate time balancing act. How do you do it all? If you’re like me, it’s a mix of very carefully planning and plunging wildly headfirst into your to-do list. Both require a level of organization that you have to consistently keep up with. Bullet journaling is my personal pie-in-the-sky of organization; however, I find it requires too much of a time commitment to do it exactly how I'd like to.

Obscure Holidays: Fun for Everyone

cwhittall's picture
Chocolate chip cookies

This month, I’ve handed the spotlight to a dear friend who always knows what obscure holiday it may be and how to celebrate it! Kami Bumgardner is the youth services coordinator at Maitland Public Library in Maitland, Fla., and works primarily with toddlers and kids through fifth grade. Any questions or comments will be forwarded to her. Enjoy!

 

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Promoting Your Event: A Timeline

jjackson's picture
Man writing in journal next to laptop

Last year, I wrote about how you can use conditional formatting in Excel to track important deadlines for promoting library programs. In order to ensure that I remember to send something out to the more than 14 communication channels that we routinely utilize at the William H. Hannon Library, these customized spreadsheets have been indispensable.

Making Money Smart Students

klewallen's picture
Piggy bank

Money Smart Week, which will be celebrated this year starting on April 21, is a national initiative of ALA and the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago to provide financial literacy programming to help members of your community better manage their personal finances.

But teaching financial literacy does not have to happen only during April. Here are a few ideas to help promote financial literacy and make money smart students any time of year. 

Making Trivia Masters: Using Trivia to Turn Students into Explorers

klewallen's picture
A woman looks for a book in the stacks.

A few months ago on Programming Librarian, I talked about asking a trivia question as part of your passive programming. Now, I've taken it a step further to create a Trivia Master Challenge that encourages students to search the library’s catalog, explore our nonfiction section, and learn how to search successfully within a book.

Passive Doesn't Mean Boring: 5 Passive Program Ideas for School Libraries

klewallen's picture
Girls making bookmarks

Passive programs can be a great way to regularly attract students into the library without having planned, specific events. Pick a corner of the library that can be designated for these drop-by activities, set out the supplies and some instructions, and let it go! Here are a few of my go-to passive programs.

Group of girls making bookmarks

Keeping Tabs on Deadlines with Excel's 'Conditional Formatting'

jjackson's picture
Calendar with glasses atop it

The William H. Hannon Library hosts over 40 programs every year. Like many colleges and universities, Loyola Marymount University has multiple public calendars, bulletin boards and online spaces where students, faculty and staff go to find information about upcoming events. To rise above the surfeit of campus programming options for our users, it's important to make sure each space is populated with library programming information in a timely fashion.

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