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Historically Speaking: Local History at the Library

dvinke's picture
Local history room finders

Like Sam Cooke, I don’t know much about history. That’s where the comparison ends. Mr. Cooke was a wonderfully talented and charismatic individual, I am not. Even though I don't know as much about history as I'd like, I (like many other individuals) won’t turn down the opportunity to discover more. I suppose that may be one reason why history programs have been so successful at our library, especially local history programs. I discovered this by accident a long time ago and would like to take the time to share with you the story.

New Year, New You: Budget Resolutions and Programming Goals

rstarr's picture
Wallet with money

The new year provides a perfect starting point for a new goal. Thousands of people take this opportunity to get a fresh start for eating better, exercising more or finally organizing that giant stack of paperwork. Unfortunately, many libraries are faced with forced fiscal resolutions; shrinking budgets require librarians think creatively in trimming their budgetary waistlines.

Help! I Want to Teach Yoga but Don't Know Where to Start

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Blogger Jenn Carson shares tips on how to teach yoga in the library.

Sometimes when I am training librarians, teachers and staff on how to start yoga programs in their schools and libraries, I see a look of fear and panic creep into their otherwise eager-to-help faces. That’s when my empathy kicks in and I think back to when I was first learning how to teach yoga to children and was completely overwhelmed.

New Year's-Inspired Crafts for Teens

A notebook craft, perfect for teens in January

Happy New Year, everyone! 2015 went by like a flash, and now we are in a brand new year. Here in California, we have been battling some extremely cold weather. Extremely cold for us, that is; we can't handle it when it gets cold. Although I must say, chilly weather is the perfect time to pick out some new books and read away. Every year I like to say that I will read at least 100 books, but I tend to lose count around summertime. I need to keep better track of my YA reads.

Hour of Code: How We Did It, What We Learned

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An Hour of Code offers basic programming tutorials for kids.

Hour of Code is an annual event (held in December during Computer Science Education Week) created in 2013 to encourage students to learn computer science and advocate for more schools to teach it. Only 25 percent of U.S. schools teach computer science, according to Computer Science Education Week. That's where libraries come in: By hosting an Hour of Code event, librarians provide a platform for patrons to receive an engaging introduction to computer programming.

Access Entertainment Introduces Patrons to Free Digital Content

Unwrapping digital presents is easy. Using them is not as simple. Some Raytown, Mo., residents head to the library to learn how to get the most out of their electronics.

Christmas is coming — and with it, library patrons looking for ways to get the most out of the electronic devices they unwrapped under the tree.

At Mid-Continent Public Library (MCPL), the Raytown Branch has created Access Entertainment, an hour-long program that takes patrons on a tour of the library’s website and shows them step-by-step how to find free books, movies and music for their personal screens.

From 'Prisoner' to 'Returning Citizen': Programs for Ex-Offenders

rstarr's picture
Open red door

One afternoon, a man approached the information desk wearing a suit and a smile. After serving a 40-year sentence, he had been released from prison only a few weeks earlier. He had come to the library to solve a big problem: his grandchildren were making fun of him because he could not use a computer. Could we help? 

Rural Roots: Holiday Tradition

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Gilpin Library Christmas tree

Rural libraries are uniquely situated within their communities to relate on a personal level, rather than merely “business as usual.” One cool way to do this is by becoming an integral part of the celebratory atmosphere around holidays. Rural libraries can plan something patriotic for Memorial Day and Veterans Day, something sparkling and loud for the 4th of July, thoughtful and reflective for Thanksgiving, and nostalgic and traditional for Christmas.

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