math/science

Free STEM Traveling Exhibition Available

It’s a good day for librarians looking for free traveling exhibitions! Earlier we shared a Civil War exhibition, and now we’re diving into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The Harvard University/Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics is looking for a few libraries that might be interested in hosting a lightweight, portable STEM multidisciplinary exhibit about universal physics concepts in 2013.

Librarians As Engineers: Robotics at Your Library

National Robotics Week (NRW) celebrates robotics technology development each April (this year it’s April 7–15). The NRW website advocates funding robotics programs while addressing its increasing use in healthcare, medicine, manufacturing, and other sectors. The site encourages educating the public about how robotics impacts society. It also encourages inspiring students to pursue careers in robotics and science, technology, engineering, and math-related fields (STEM).

More Free Workshops on Astronomy and Maya Culture

Calendar in the Sky” is a NASA-funded project led by the UC Berkeley Center for Science Education at the Space Sciences Laboratory to engage the American public in NASA science (space exploration, astronomy, planetary and Earth sciences, etc.) via the broad interest in Maya culture.

Calling Rural Librarians

The San Jacinto (Tex.) College District, a NASA partner, is developing a grant proposal that would involve professional development for rural librarians to prepare them to present STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) programs in libraries. The project will also examine how informal science learning takes place in rural libraries and will help rural librarians gain the skills to create informal science events that capture the interests of the communities and regions they serve.

Attend a Free Workshop on Astronomy and Maya Culture

“Calendar in the Sky” is a NASA-funded project led by the UC Berkeley Center for Science Education at the Space Sciences Laboratory to engage the American public in NASA science (space exploration, astronomy, planetary and Earth sciences, etc.) via the broad interest in Maya culture. This project emphasizes the interplay of science and culture embodied by Maya calendars and addresses misconceptions about the Maya. It also uses NASA resources to inform the public about the astronomical basis of the Maya calendar system and dispels misconceptions about the year 2012.

Share Your STEM Program Experiences

The American Library Association Public Programs Office is collaborating with the National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) at Space Science Institute (SSI), Boulder, Colorado, the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), and the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) on a series of science exhibits and programs in libraries. To help develop these exhibits and programs, the participating institutions have created the STAR_Net project (Science-Technology Activities and Resources Library Education Network).

Science That’s Fun (and Messy!)

The Wilkinson Public Library in Telluride, Colorado, is launching its “No School Science Project” for children tomorrow. Partnering with the Pinhead Institute, the library developed this series of after-school programs to inspire students in grades three to six to learn about science. The four sessions include:

A Science Café in a Library?

How do a Science Café and a university library fit together? Actually, they are a perfect match. One of the goals of the University of Southern Mississippi Libraries is to promote the library as the intellectual and cultural center of the campus. Having a Science Café series within the library helps us accomplish this initiative.

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