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History

Everything Jersey 2016

Everything Jersey 2016 event series logo

We created the yearlong Everything Jersey 2016 series to inform our community about New Jersey history, food, entertainment, wildlife and tourism. We presented a total of 11 programs, tying them to celebration months or other popular program themes while highlighting aspects of our state’s history and culture. This series could be easily adapted in other states.

Three Workshops, Many Histories: History Programs on Campus

kkelly's picture
Hands on history flier

The University of Dayton Libraries’ exploration of program models continued during the fall 2016 semester with a trio of new history-focused workshops. In support of University of Dayton’s Housing and Residence Life curriculum (see The Swipe is Right for more details), these workshops identified and addressed connecting students to personal and local histories as an important learning outcome.

Family History Day

A photo of a woman.

Our library created a mini-genealogy conference called Family History Day. The event, which took place on a single Saturday in October, combined our genealogy classes from previous years with new activities. This format allowed us to concentrate our staffing needs into one day and three spaces, rather than spreading the need for staffing throughout the month.

History Comes Alive

Emily Goodridge Grey talking to kids

History Comes Alive is a series of programs featuring dramatic portrayals of African American men and women who impacted not just Minnesota, but the entire nation. In these programs, historical figures come to life through performances by museum-trained actors, scripted storytelling and the use of props, artifacts, letters, publications, illustrations and maps. The series is offered in collaboration with the Minnesota African American Museum.

Tactile Tactics for Learning History

jcarson's picture
Boy carrying water with a yoke

When we hear the words "kinesthetic" or "physical" linked with literacy, we often think of sports, gym class, dance, yoga and other gross-motor-type programs. What we often overlook is how we are already incorporating much physical literacy in our library programs by adding tactile, hands-on activities to storytimes or events. And this is awesome — not only are we appealing to tactile learners (those than learn best by doing, not just seeing or hearing) but we are enhacing everyone's literacy skills, even the parents!

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