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information literacy

Deepfakes, Part 2: Resources for All Ages

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Hands holding puppet strings

Last month, our blog provided an introduction to deepfakes, a technique in which artificial intelligence-based technology is used to alter or produce video content, tricking viewers into believing that something happened when it actually did not.

This month, we follow up with more on this important subject, including resources and programming ideas for all ages.

Changing Landscapes: Information Evolution

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Two people pointing at laptop screen

Between the two of us we have over 45 years of teaching experience. (Yes, we are stunned by that, too!) From the beginning, our library programming has taught students to responsibly and critically select and evaluate their resources. It’s the very foundation of media and information literacy and a critical skill for students to master in their K-12 education. 

It's Never Too Early: Media Literacy in Children’s Programming

To become a successful student and mature adult, children need to develop critical thinking skills. In the ever-changing world of electronic communication and emerging technologies, how can library workers help children develop and activate skills necessary to access, evaluate and create media? What better way to promote media literacy skill development than through library programming?

Is Your Online Reputation College- and Career-Ready?

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Teen at Computer Photo by Steinar Engeland on Unsplash

Digital footprint, digital dossier, online reputation, digital reputation … insert your term here: _________. Whatever you choose to call it, teaching high school students how to manage their online reputation is more about teaching them to share thoughtfully and less about telling them not to post. 

Kindergarten and Media Literacy: Using PBS' 'Arthur' to Start the Conversation

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Kids watching a show on an iPad

Information literacy skills are a cornerstone to school library instruction. Teacher librarians have taught them for years. Why revisit them now? Before we get into how to use "Arthur" to teach media literacy, we thought it might be nice to give you a little background on why our passion for information literacy programming in school libraries was re-energized and renewed.

Post-Truth: Fake News and a New Era of Information Literacy

Programming Librarian

Talk of fake news and the need for critical thinking skills have been in heavy rotation in the media in recent months, with new calls for the public to acquire appropriate research and evaluation skills and become more information savvy. However, none of this is new for librarians and information professionals, particularly for those who teach information literacy classes! With this renewed interest, librarians have brand new opportunities to impart these skills to patrons.

In this webinar, participants will:

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