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Deepfakes, Part 2: Resources for All Ages

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Hands holding puppet strings

Last month, our blog provided an introduction to deepfakes, a technique in which artificial intelligence-based technology is used to alter or produce video content, tricking viewers into believing that something happened when it actually did not.

This month, we follow up with more on this important subject, including resources and programming ideas for all ages.

Changing Landscapes: Information Evolution

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Two people pointing at laptop screen

Between the two of us we have over 45 years of teaching experience. (Yes, we are stunned by that, too!) From the beginning, our library programming has taught students to responsibly and critically select and evaluate their resources. It’s the very foundation of media and information literacy and a critical skill for students to master in their K-12 education. 

Deepfakes: What They Are, Why They Matter

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An extreme close-up of a person's eye

With the 2020 election right around the corner, there is an Internet trend that should give angst to anyone who works with young people and/or information literacy.

It’s called a “deepfake,” and it is a technique in which artificial intelligence-based technology is used to alter or produce video content. Essentially, a deepfake is a video of something that looks like it occurred, but truly did not.

The Truth Is Out There: Fact-Checking Resources for Students

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Person holding magnifying glass and taking notes in a book

Do you ever feel like you have slipped into an episode of "The Twilight Zone" or "The X-Files" when you see some of the “facts” your students share? Do you wonder where they found these “facts,” or how to convince students that they might not be using the most reliable of resources?

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