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Intergenerational Programs

14 Budget-Friendly Tabletop Games Your Library Should Have (Part 1: The Classics)

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A child playing Jenga

Ever think about starting a tabletop game collection at your library? If you're a game enthusiast, you could probably come up with a whole list of ideas that would blow your patrons' minds — and your library's budget. Board games, after all, can be both exciting and pricey.

But if you can solicit donations of gently used games — or find them for cheap — you might be able to amass a larger collection that you thought possible.

Tile Art: A Creative Program for All Ages

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A program participant holds up their finished tile art project

The L.P. Fisher Public Library in Woodstock, New Brunswick, likes to periodically hold Family Art Nights. It is a process-oriented, intergenerational program that allows people of all ages, whether they think of themselves as “artistic” or not, to try their hand at something creative. There is no defined outcome, so people can experiment and enjoy the process of play, something that is very good for relieving stress.

A Range of Ages: Mixed-Age Play at the Library

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Three young children browsing books on a table at an outdoor event.

If you spend any time on social media, especially if you follow other libraries, librarians or community groups, you’ve probably heard a lot of talk about intergenerational programming. I have read news stories about daycare groups being integrated with seniors’ homes, or 20-somethings finding mentors (and roommates!) in older adults.

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