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media literacy

Deepfakes, Part 2: Resources for All Ages

Hands holding puppet strings

Last month, our blog provided an introduction to deepfakes, a technique in which artificial intelligence-based technology is used to alter or produce video content, tricking viewers into believing that something happened when it actually did not.

This month, we follow up with more on this important subject, including resources and programming ideas for all ages.

Changing Landscapes: Information Evolution

Two people pointing at laptop screen

Between the two of us we have over 45 years of teaching experience. (Yes, we are stunned by that, too!) From the beginning, our library programming has taught students to responsibly and critically select and evaluate their resources. It’s the very foundation of media and information literacy and a critical skill for students to master in their K-12 education. 

Election 2020: Information Literacy Refresh

Photograph of a roll of I Voted sitckers.

When we first started blogging for Programming Librarian, it was January 2018. We had just presented at the 2017 American Association of School Librarians (AASL) Conference in Phoenix on the trend of fake news that was on the uptick leading up to and after the 2016 presidential election.

Well, here we are again, leading up to another presidential election. And adding to that, we’re in the midst of a pandemic and nationwide protests over racial justice and police brutality.

Digital Storytelling in 6 Steps

A carrot-shaped cutout against a background with the words "Carrot's in a Pickle"

As I write this, in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic, it seems like online programs are the only way for librarians to connect with their patrons. Digital storytelling is a creative way to engage patrons virtually right now — and as a bonus, you will learn some fantastic skills you can take back to your libraries when this is all over, for intergenerational workshops or homeschooling projects to improve digital literacy. So let's get started!

It's Never Too Early: Media Literacy in Children’s Programming

To become a successful student and mature adult, children need to develop critical thinking skills. In the ever-changing world of electronic communication and emerging technologies, how can library workers help children develop and activate skills necessary to access, evaluate and create media? What better way to promote media literacy skill development than through library programming?

Deepfakes: What They Are, Why They Matter

An extreme close-up of a person's eye

With the 2020 election right around the corner, there is an Internet trend that should give angst to anyone who works with young people and/or information literacy.

It’s called a “deepfake,” and it is a technique in which artificial intelligence-based technology is used to alter or produce video content. Essentially, a deepfake is a video of something that looks like it occurred, but truly did not.

Media Literacy at Your Library Training

Join the ALA Public Programs Office and the Center for News Literacy at Stony Brook University for a one-day workshop to learn how your library can help adults in your community become eagle-eyed news consumers.

Media Literacy at Your Library Training will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, June 21, as part of the 2019 ALA Annual Conference (June 20 to 25).

In this intensive one-day preconference, participants will:

Kindergarten and Media Literacy: Using PBS' 'Arthur' to Start the Conversation

Kids watching a show on an iPad

Information literacy skills are a cornerstone to school library instruction. Teacher librarians have taught them for years. Why revisit them now? Before we get into how to use "Arthur" to teach media literacy, we thought it might be nice to give you a little background on why our passion for information literacy programming in school libraries was re-energized and renewed.

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