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Our Picks for ALA Annual Conference 2022

May 11, 2022
Our Picks for ALA Annual 2022
Text reads: ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition - Washington DC - June 23-28, 2022 #ALAAC22 ALAANNUAL.ORG

Set your schedule for ALA Annual 2022 with these can't-miss sessions for programming librarians.

In June 2022, ALA Annual Conference is back in person for the first time since 2019! The Walter E. Washington Convention Center will host headliners such as Tiffany Haddish, John Cho and Maria Hinojosa.

Image shows ALA Annual COnference & Exhibition Logo. Text reads: Washington DC - June 23-28, 2022 - ALAANNUAL.ORG #ALAAC22 - 160+ Education Sessions, 12+ Speakers, 80 Author Sessions, 550+ ExhibitorsJoin us in person in Washington D.C. or sign up for The Digital Experience. Either way you decide to participate, you'll get a top-quality experience from sessions with featured thought-leaders; educational programming; important announcements and updates; relevant legislation and policies; and discussions that majorly impact libraries, their roles, and their ongoing transformation.

Not registered yet? Register now and start planning your schedule with our top picks below. See you in D.C.!


Friday, June 24

World on the Move, A Traveling Exhibition About Migrations Available for Libraries

8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 140A

The ALA Public Programs Office will seek libraries to host a traveling exhibition beginning in January 2023. Developed by the American Anthropological Association and the Smithsonian’s Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, the exhibit surveys human population movements and the lived experiences of migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers around the world. Its central idea is that nearly everyone has a migration story somewhere in their family history, and this commonality is an essential element of the human condition. Join this session to hear about the exhibit’s content and discuss community partnerships, public programming events and activities, and educational resources available.

STEAM Equity: Gender Equitable STEAM Programming (ticketed event)

9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 150B

Gender equity and cultural responsiveness are the core of an ongoing ALA project to offer STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Math) programming and exhibitions for rural community members, especially often-underreached Latinx populations. Learn from project partners like the STAR Library Network and the Emmy award-winning SciGirls television show to explore the importance of gender equitable programs where girls can develop positive STEAM identities. Learn strategies that use the latest research in engaging girls in science learning, participate in interactive activities geared for tweens, and explore culturally responsive exhibitions for the library setting. Gain facilitation strategies, STEAM activities, and supporting resources.

SustainRT Lightning Discussions

10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Location: Marriot Marquis, George Washington University

All are welcome to join the Sustainability Round Table for a lively session of lightning rounds focused on library engagement with sustainability issues across the spectrum of library types.


Saturday, June 25

I mean, Disabilities Are Hard: Toward Inclusion and Equity for Young Children with Disabilities in Public Library Programs

8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 103A

The purpose of this session is to facilitate conversation about strategies and practices that public libraries, across the rural to urban continuum, can use to ensure inclusivity for children with disabilities and developmental delays and their families.

How to Apply: ALA Grant Proposal Writing Tips for Small and Rural Libraries

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 151A

Do you struggle with grant writing? Here is a chance to brush up your skills in time to apply for a special ALA grant opportunity. In late 2022, ALA will launch a new opportunity for small and rural libraries that will provide grants ranging from $10,000 to $20,000 to increase the accessibility of their facilities, services, and programs to better serve people with disabilities. In this session, participants will get a sneak peek of the opportunity and learn tips for writing competitive proposals for grant opportunities from ALA’s Public Programs Office. There will also be time at the end of the session for Q&A.

Welcome to Today's Library: Evolving Programming to Meet Today's Needs

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 145A

As customer needs and access changed, these library systems reimagined services to reflect the new customer experience. Employee-driven digital content teams identified what worked and what didn’t, guiding programming staff through the transition from traditional to virtual program delivery. New, innovative hybrid programs allowed staff to work together in new ways to reach our various audiences. Marketing teams restructured social media use to focus on content promotion, more than tripling customer engagement. Panelists will share outcomes from the past year that transformed library services and organizational structure – such as pioneering discoverable programs in the public catalog with business partner SirsiDynix, creating new departments dedicated to ensuring a seamless customer experience, reimagining marketing strategies to maximize engagement with existing and new library users, and bridging the digital divide through unique digital literacy programs and maximizing the use of technology.

Using Kidlit to Reach and Engage At-Risk Youth

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 159A-B

At-risk young adults in, for instance, foster care or other institutional settings, the un-housed, those who are abused or struggling with poverty, or whose parents are incarcerated or addicted, may be more difficult for librarians to reach, but engaging them with appropriate kid lit from authentic voices whose lived experience mirrors their own can literally be a lifesaver. Five authors — four of whom are 2022 Debuts — will share their experiences as at-risk youth for whom the library was a haven and strategies for reaching and engaging kids like them.

Everyone is Welcome: Designing for Diversity, Equity, Inclusion & Accessibility in Library Buildings

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 144B-C

What does Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Accessibility (DEIA) mean to you and your library facility? As we design our library buildings, we have become increasingly focused on features that promote an inclusive culture that recognizes our humanity in the differences we may have within our communities. Through the physical environment, we hope to promote impartiality and fairness and allow everyone access to the library spaces, services, and materials. We will present real life examples and case studies that support elements of design that encourage DEIA in our facilities, such as sensory areas, prayer/meditation spaces, cultural and social amenities. We will ultimately lead attendees through an exercise where they can explore the concepts and take away ideas to apply in their own library

Let Teens Lead: Strategies for Build Programs Developed By Teens, For Teens

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 146C

Are you curious about learning how to implement youth voice in your teen program planning? In this session, you will receive insight from teen leaders that will help you confidently put teens in leadership positions to develop more engaging programming. Some key tools will include: different models for teen leadership depending on the organizational structure of your institution, strategies for building and maintaining healthy teams that include both adult and teen leaders, marketing approaches to engage more teen leaders, and more.

New Connections: Creating Successful Online Book Clubs for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities 

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 146C

Online book clubs are an enjoyable way to provide equitable access to library services for adults and older teens with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. You will leave this session with a plan to effectively create online book clubs for this underserved population. Learn how to market your program, train staff, choose age-appropriate books for participants to read aloud, and promote improved literacy through thoughtful discussion and vocabulary support. Join the Gwinnett County Public Library and the Dunamis Educational Foundation as they discuss their partnership and the unexpected benefits of switching to an online format.

Branching Out: Pushing Our Libraries To More Deeply Connect With Communities of Color

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 154A-B

Albany Public Library was the recipient of ALA’s 2021 Libraries Transform Communities Engagement Grant for its Branching Out program, a community initiative intended to uplift local Black voices in music and art. The library expanded this through additional grants and sponsorships into a multi-library program involving the creation of a traveling mural displayed throughout the region and forging new relationships with libraries and people of color in their communities. Participants will be engaged throughout with interactive discussions including EDI self-assessments and planning guides, as well as sharing of slides, resource lists, and music and video from the program. Attendees will leave with a vibrant experience of the program and thorough understanding of the steps undergone, and a toolkit for running Branching Out programs in their communities.

Climate Justice: Creating Sustainability Programming with EDI in Mind

1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 151B

As our world continues to grapple with the reality of climate change as well as the challenge of creating a more just and equitable future for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC), how can libraries lead change within their own communities?

In this panel discussion, we will hear from three librarians who have created innovative programming focused on climate change with equity, diversity, and inclusion as a central part of the discussion. Kristina Gómez, formerly of the Milwaukee (WI) Public Library, led an initiative to connect residents in under-resourced neighborhoods to home vegetable gardening by providing them with materials, installation assistance, and ongoing support and learning opportunities. Beatriz Echeverria of Evanston (IL) Public Library created virtual programming to teach Spanish speakers about climate change and hosted a hands-on virtual workshop to train domestic workers on handling store-bought cleaning products and their rights when working with potentially dangerous chemicals. Nick Demske of Racine (WI) Public Library organized climate change action talks with and for local Black and Latinx residents to purposefully include voices in the conversation that historically were not prioritized in discussions of climate change. Gómez, Echeverria, and Demske were participants in ALA’s 2020-2021 Resilient Communities: Libraries Respond to Climate Change initiative. Attendees of this panel discussion will leave with ideas and advice to foster these important dialogues in their own libraries.

Top Ten Banned Author: A Conversation with George M. Johnson, author of "All Boys Aren't Blue" and "We are Not Broken"

1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 146B

George M. Johnson (they, their) is a non-binary, activist, journalist, and bestselling author. In this program, IFRT Chair, Rhonda Evans will discuss their ground-breaking books "All Boys Aren't Blue " and “We Are Not Broken.” Johnson’s vital work dealing with homophobia, transphobia and racism and has been targeted for removal in at least 15 states. They will also discuss the importance of celebrating Black boyhood, brotherhood, and matriarchal love.

Trauma in the Library

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 146B

Trauma-informed care for library patrons is a growing movement, however, what about workplace trauma experienced by library staff? Our session uses the Fishbowl technique to share survey+interview insights and gather diverse further evidence for our IMLS-funded study “Trauma in the Library: Symptoms of PTSD Among Staff and Methods for Ensuring Trauma-Informed Care.” 

Teen Library Internships: Preparing Youth for the Future

4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 140A

The innovative concept of offering teen library internships in school, public, special, and university libraries is taking wing in a number of libraries and associated settings today. Speakers will share advice and details based on their experiences with teen internships that libraries can use to build meaningful internship opportunities at their own libraries. Teen library internships provide a new way of encouraging youth participation, help teens to develop valuable knowledge and skills for their futures, encourage teens to become dedicated library users and supporters into adulthood, and sometimes lead to beneficial partnerships. Libraries that want to be on the cutting edge of trends in library teen services and teen career development will want to consider adding teen internships to their repertoire of opportunities for active teen involvement. This program can help to get started!


Sunday, June 26

Library Outreach Programming for Expectant Parents and Parents of Newborns

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 140B

How can we reach expectant parents from underserved and unserved populations with the message that literacy begins before birth, letting them know the important role they play in their babies' development while showing them playful ways to talk, sing, and share books with their babies from the very start? "Mother Goose on the Loose: Hatchlings", is a research-based collaborative project of the Maryland State Department of Education, Maryland State Library, Mother Goose on the Loose, local librarians, and community partners. Hatchlings: Ready to Hatch is a one session program for pregnant adults. Hatchlings: In the Nest consists of four weekly sessions geared for parents with newborns from birth to four months. Both versions of Hatchlings have already been successfully piloted virtually with English and Spanish speakers in Maryland.

Beyond Booklists: Family Engagement through Race & Culture Education at the Library

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 150A

Many libraries provide well-curated booklists depicting plenty of everyday diversity, as well as booklists highlighting the history of race and racism in America. No doubt, these are important materials and resources, and serve an absolutely essential purpose. But what else can public libraries offer to help families learn the truth about race and culture, and fight racism? In 2021-2022, presenters created and presented a race & culture curriculum for families of various racial and cultural backgrounds, while being sensitive to avoid harm that can easily occur in race education such as curricular trauma. Join Betsy Bird, moderator, with presenters Cozbi A. Cabrera, Tracy Olasimbo, Carmen Francellno, Kellye Fleming, Jessica Iverson, Kennedy Joseph, and Sally Battle to delve into their experiences creating and presenting this curriculum to families.

Building Organizational Capacity for Community-Led Programs in Public Libraries

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 147B

How can your public library turn its EDISJ values into real action in its public programs? Community-led planning is a method for returning institutional power to communities that have experienced oppression. Discover the results of a new research study on how to build organizational capacity for community-led programming, and learn the twelve steps your library can take to grow. Then hear from both a librarian and community member about a real-world community-led program, Escuela de la Vida, that will help you connect the research to practice.

Deaf Culture: Libraries Connect - A Library Strategy for Inclusive Deaf Community Engagement

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 143B

Underserved and non-served deaf communities frequently don't have access to a public library, or aren't aware of existing services that would meet their information needs. How can library professionals effectively reach out to this underserved community? Join us for a panel about how libraries, schools, nonprofits, and other organizations and institutions can leverage programming to break down barriers of misunderstanding and to open opportunities among the larger populace. Librarians serve in unique positions that can enable portals that could, in turn, help a deaf child transcend the metamorphosis of infancy to adulthood as a productive and contributing member of society. The end objective is twofold: to enable librarians as they are and to empower librarians of the future.

Public and Cultural Programs Advisory Committee Meeting

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 148

The Public and Cultural Programs Advisory Committee (PPOPCPAC) Annual Meeting. Charge: To serve as an advisory committee to the ALA Public Programs Office. To promote excellence in cultural programming; to assist library staff to become more effective providers of cultural programming; to identify and disseminate resources for cultural programming, and to promote the cultural communities fund. New and potential members are welcome!

Humanities for One and All: Making Humanities Programs Inclusive and Relevant

1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 151A

The world needs the humanities now more than ever before—they help us understand other languages, histories, and cultures while fostering social justice and equity. Engaging audiences via humanities programming can seem daunting, but it is possible by starting with intention.

How do you connect with community partners to gather feedback on what would be relevant for their audiences? What steps do you take to welcome new people to the library through dynamic events that also encourage reflection and community-building? At this session, you will learn from staff at Princeton Public Library about how they have spent the last 10 years using their library’s role as a community hub to elevate the humanities and serve varied audiences. In addition, project directors from The Black Metropolis Research Consortium (BMRC) and Glen Ellyn Public Library, two of the institutions that were awarded funding via the American Rescue Plan: Humanities Grants for Libraries, will share their experiences in providing inclusive and relevant humanities programs to their communities. Attend this session to find out how your library can engage and excite your community with the humanities.

Innovative Adult Programming: Pivoting Successfully From In Person To Virtual

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 158A-N

Cooking, Crocheting and Coping blended the skills of a psychologist, a nutritionist, and a fitness trainer to provide coping strategies to tap into a person's creativity to improve self-esteem and build resilience. S.E.E (Shop, Eat and Exercise) Yourself Healthy taught participants nutritional benefits and fitness routines with the aim to make lifestyle modifications aimed at improving optimum health.


Monday, June 27

Engaging Historically Underrepresented Young Adult Readers

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 146C

Underrepresented young adult readers (BIPOC, LGBTQIA+, Disabled, Neuro-Divergent, etc.) who do not see themselves depicted in in an accurate, respectful manner may lose interest in reading for a lifetime. Worse, they may internalize this lack of respectful representation as not being worthy of it. Five historically underrepresented, debut authors will share how it felt not to see themselves in fiction and share strategies that would have engaged them. Participants will leave the session with actionable tactics such as: Leaning Into the News Cycle, Identifying and Serving Local Demographics, and Creating a Representational Calendar.

Reading in the Negative Space; using poetry and art to create community when technology is not an option

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 150B

This project uses Yusef Salaam's "Punching the Air" as a way to help incarcerated youth engage with literacy in a way that is free from the judgment so often associated with the reading and writing that occurs in the classroom. This book, based on the wrongful incarceration of Yuseef Salam, was chosen in the hope that students would find solace in Yuseef’s ability to survive and cope with his incarceration through art and that they might use art and writing as a way to reflect on their own, often painful, experiences. Additionally, our project purposely takes place outside of the classroom to help nurture a love of literature based on play and relationship building. For many of our students, many of whom are two or more grade levels behind in reading proficiency, this sense of freedom to explore words and stories in a safe space affords them the confidence to rethink their assumptions about what reading is and who qualifies as a “reader.”

TikTok & Libraries: A Powerful Partnership

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 154A-B

Join high school librarian Kelsey Bogan to learn all about how TikTok is a fantastic social media platform for libraries. You'll learn how libraries are successfully leveraging the incredible power & reach of TikTok for things like: advocacy, community building, collection development (especially diverse collection development!), readers advisory, instructional tutorials, PD, and more. You'll get to see plenty of examples of how a libraries use TikTok, and learn about how TikTok is taking the publishing world by storm (and causing more teens to read!). You can also follow Kelsey on TikTok @gvhslibrary to see her library's TikTok in action!

Building Inclusive Self-Paced Programs for Entrepreneurs

10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 151A

What resources, tools, and technologies does your library already have to support entrepreneurs and small business owners in your community? With creativity and innovation, your library can provide materials, learning opportunities, and other supports to entrepreneurs that address their specific needs and schedules and builds your library’s capacity. This session will explore two Libraries Build Business initiatives which feature self-paced learning programs for entrepreneurs: the Los Angeles Public Library's Sea un Vendedor Ambulante Exitoso/Successful Street Vending program which uses Cell-Ed, and the Independence Public Library's Cultivate Indy, which used Beanstack. Join the conversation to learn more about the strategies and frameworks that were used to connect entrepreneurs to successful pathways, developing self-paced and experiential learning using technology, and centering and supporting underrepresented entrepreneurs and small business owners with promising and responsive models and strategies.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Special Projects Showcase

1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 140A

Over the last few years, particularly since the 2020 summer of racial reawakening, many libraries have started special projects and initiatives to address diversity, equity, inclusion, and anti-racism in our collections, technology, staffing and leadership. This presentation showcase will highlight some of the ongoing or completed projects by librarians at public, academic, and special libraries. Panelists will be selected to ensure that this showcase is of value to librarians and administrators in a wide variety of roles and from many types of libraries.

Drag Queen Story Hour for Library Staff

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 146A

Drag Queen Story Hour began in San Francisco in 2015. Since then, libraries and literacy organizations across the country have organized drag queen story hour events to promote diversity, inclusion ,and queer culture in their communities. Join us for a special drag queen story hour just for librarians. Experience first hand the benefits of this iconic program.

Help your community by offering passport services at your library

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 150A

Many communities lack adequate passport acceptance agencies. When Salt Lake City Public Library added this service in 2019 they saw how difficult it could be for many people to take time away from work to apply for a passport. Setting up an appointment was a challenge for many. By offering weekend and evening hours, we were able to make it easier for working families to apply for passports. The demand for passports has increased in 2021 and the increased demand is projected to continue. We’ll review the application process and how to contact and work with your regional passport agency. We'll discuss the space and equipment needed; and show you how many libraries have redeployed staff and increased revenue by adding this service. Our communities appreciate the friendly service and beautiful space that our libraries can offer passport applicants. Offering passport services is an opportunity to show residents who aren't library users the services a library can provide. Join this session and consider adding passport services with convenient hours at your library.

Reimagining Library Spaces and Programming to Make Nature-Centered Exploration Accessible to Historically Marginalized Communities

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Location: Washington Convention Center, 140B

Inequity in access to green spaces has long been an issue for marginalized communities. At the same time, a mounting body of evidence demonstrates the mental and physical benefits of exposure to natural elements. Evidence also shows that interaction with natural elements inspires curiosity, engagement, teamwork and scientific exploration. This hands-on, interactive session presents innovative, data-backed ways to reimagine library space and programming to make experiences with nature accessible to all. Studies show that adding natural elements to library spaces can decrease stress and anxiety by 37% and increase focus and productivity by more than 10%. Moreover, these elements can be used to foster interdisciplinary STEAM studies and inspire curiosity, engagement, teamwork and scientific exploration. 

Date / Time
Wednesday, May 11, 2022 - 09:15
Job Functions
Professional Development/Training
Comments:
Programming Librarian Forum